The Jerome N. Frank Legal Services Organization of Yale Law School (LSO) invites applications for its 2018 Summer Fellowship program. Applications will be accepted from December 4, 2017 and reviewed on a rolling basis. LSO is the main organization at Yale Law School providing legal representation to individuals and organizations in need of legal assistance but unable to afford private attorneys.  During the academic year, law students work closely with clinical faculty members to represent clients in a wide range of litigation and non-litigation matters, helping to fill a critical need in legal services delivery for poor and marginalized communities in Connecticut.  LSO seeks to hire 20-25 Summer Fellows to work with clinical faculty in order to continue this client representation. These are paid positions, with a salary of $6,960 for 12 weeks of full-time work ($14.50/hour). The Fellowship will run from May 22 to August 17, 2018, with some flexibility as to start and end dates.  Part-time work or full-time work for a portion of the Fellowship period may also be possible.

                Summer Fellows can expect to have a range of challenging and rewarding lawyering experiences during the course of their time at LSO, including client interviewing and counseling; factual development of cases; researching and writing legal memoranda; drafting of contracts and other legal instruments; interacting with opposing counsel, government actors, and community stakeholders; and negotiation and alternative dispute resolution.  In several of our clinics, students will make court appearances to argue motions or present evidence.  Fellows will work under the direct supervision of clinical faculty members and supervising attorneys, and will have significant responsibility for each case or project on which they work.  In addition, faculty members will host a weekly series of presentations and discussions for the Fellows on the work of the clinics, public interest lawyering, and other topics of interest.

                LSO clinics perform a wide range of exciting work, including litigation in state and federal court and before administrative agencies, transactional work on behalf of community organizations, and policy and legislative advocacy at the local, state, and federal levels.  For 2018, LSO seeks Summer Fellows for the following clinics:

  • Advanced Sentencing Clinic
  • Challenging Mass Incarceration Clinic
  • Ludwig Community and Economic Development Clinic
  • Criminal Justice Clinic
  • Immigration Legal Services Clinic
  • Housing Clinic
  • Veterans Legal Services Clinic
  • Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic

For more information on the work of each of these clinics, please visit www.law.yale.edu/lso.

                Students who are eligible for summer funding from their own sources and who need an early decision on their LSO application to qualify for outside support are encouraged to advise LSO of their situation and to request expedited review of their candidacy.

Interested students should email a cover letter specifying the clinic(s) in which you have an interest, a resume, writing sample, transcript, and contact information for two references to lso.fellowships@yale.edu. (Transcripts, if not immediately available, can be sent after the initial application, but before the submission deadline.) The final deadline to submit application materials is February 10, 2018.  Early applications are encouraged.

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The Washington Legal Clinic for the Homeless seeks interns for the Fall Semester. The Legal Clinic provides District of Columbia residents with legal representation in public benefits, shelter, housing, police misconduct, disability rights, and other civil matters. Our interns work alongside staff attorneys in providing direct representation, education and policy advocacy on behalf of individuals and families experiencing, or at risk of, homelessness.

Under attorney supervision, interns gain experience doing the following:
-Direct client casework
– Legal research
– Drafting legal pleadings
– Public policy advocacy
– Community engagement

Qualifications: Internships are open to current law students who have completed at least one year of law school. Ideal applicants have a demonstrated interest in homelessness, affordable housing, social justice, legal services, public policy advocacy, and/or public interest law, and are interested in doing pro bono or public interest law upon graduation. Applicants should have good oral and written communication skills. Prior experience and interest in direct services and/or working with people who are homeless is helpful, but not required.

Ideal applicants have a demonstrated interest in:
– Social justice
– Homelessness
– Affordable housing
– Legal services & public interest law
– Public policy advocacy

How to apply: Applications will be accepted through Monday, September 18th. Our internships are unpaid; however, we encourage applicants to seek out credit or funding from their schools or other fellowship sources. To apply, send a cover letter, resume, and writing sample to our volunteer coordinator:
Kelsey Vaughan
kelsey.vaughan@legalclinic.org (email submission is preferred)
Washington Legal Clinic for the Homeless
1200 U Street, NW
Washington, D.C. 20009
Or, for more information, call 202-328-5500.

The D.C. Bar Pro Bono Center (PBC) has an opening for a Managing Attorney. The Managing Attorney (MA) plans and oversees legal clinics and other projects for the PBC to deliver pro bono legal information, advice and representation to low-income individuals in the District of Columbia. The position requires substantive experience in housing law.  See the full announcement here.

The Washington Legal Clinic for the Homeless seeks to hire a full-time, experienced staff attorney for its Affordable Housing Initiative.  See the full announcement here.

The DC Bar Pro Bono center is seeking a managing attorney for housing law matters.  You can see the full announcement here.

The Legal Aid Society of the District of Columbia seeks a Supervising Attorney or Staff Attorney for its housing law unit. Legal Aid was formed in 1932 to “provide legal aid and counsel to indigent persons in civil law matters and to encourage measures by which the law may better protect and serve their needs.” Legal Aid is the oldest and largest general civil legal services program in the District of Columbia. The largest part of our work is comprised of individual representation in housing, family law, public benefits, and consumer law. From the experiences of our clients, we identify opportunities for law reform, public policy advocacy, and systemic reform litigation.

Tasks and Duties

Legal Aid has a broad and energetic housing practice. We give priority to cases that involve the prevention of an avoidable eviction, efforts to address dangerous or unhealthful housing conditions, and the preservation of affordable housing and public and assisted housing. In addition to an active litigation docket, we engage in significant efforts to address issues of public policy. Our unit is staffed by three supervising attorneys, nine senior staff attorneys and staff attorneys, three “loaned associates” from law firms, and a legal assistant.

Housing attorneys work at Legal Aid’s central office and its community office in Southeast DC. Attorneys also work on two projects: our Court-Based Legal Services Project, which sites a legal services office in Landlord-Tenant Court to provide same-day representation, and our Housing Right to Counsel Pilot Project, which seeks to reduce eviction of low-income tenants living in subsidized housing by significantly expanding their access to legal services.

A Staff Attorney would be expected to handle a caseload of housing cases, perform intakes, and engage in community outreach, policy advocacy and systemic reform efforts. An experienced attorney also might assist in supervising volunteer interns and law firm loaned associates. A Supervising Attorney would co-supervise the housing unit staff (including senior staff attorneys, staff attorneys, and “loaned associates” from law firms and volunteer interns). In addition, she or he will handle a modest individual caseload, provide management assistance, work on policy advocacy, conduct intakes, and help shape the direction of Legal Aid’s housing law unit.

Qualifications

The ideal candidate will have the following:

  • Experience in legal services, preferably with a background in housing law;
  • Strong litigation, organizational, communication, and leadership skills;
  • The ability to work collaboratively with other staff;
  • A demonstrated commitment to social and economic justice; and
  • Bilingual skills strongly preferred but not required.

Membership or eligibility for membership in the DC bar is required.

The ideal Staff Attorney candidate will have practiced for two to three years in legal services, with a background in housing law. The ideal Supervising Attorney candidate will have significant experience in a legal services housing practice and prior supervisory experience.

Salary and Benefits

The attorney will be paid in accordance with Legal Aid’s attorney salary scale. Legal Aid also offers a competitive benefits package.

To Apply

Legal Aid values an inclusive, diverse workplace and encourages applications from interested persons from diverse backgrounds of any race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, physical or mental disability, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, marital status, personal appearance, family responsibilities, matriculation, political affiliation, genetic information, or any other legally protected status. We strongly encourage applications from people with personal experience with the criminal justice system and/or with lived experiences in the communities we serve. Please submit a letter of interest and resume to:  https://legalaiddc.bamboohr.com/jobs/view.php?id=2.

Applications will be reviewed as they are submitted. Position remains open until filled.

Staff Attorney—CLS Housing Unit

Community Legal Services (CLS) of Philadelphia is seeking an attorney in its Housing Unit. CLS is one of the leading legal services programs in the country. This exciting and demanding position is for a lawyer to represent clients in public housing and private landlord-tenant matters. This position primarily entails zealous representation of a significant number of individual clients each week in court and administrative hearings. The position also entails helping to identify systemic issues and engaging in systems and policy advocacy work in consultation with the managing attorney. The staff attorney will also have housing related intake duties, project management and supervision of staff and interns as needed.

Lawyers in the Housing Unit zealously represents private, public, and subsidized housing tenants in matters involving eviction, illegal lockouts, fair housing violations, termination or loss of subsidy, and substandard housing. Representation includes all the elements of litigation including client interviewing, investigation, discovery, identifying and preparing witnesses and exhibits, pleadings, briefs, and representation at hearings at trial level and appellate levels as appropriate.

Lawyers will also be expected to provide supervision and support to paralegals, social workers, and interns who are providing advice, brief service, and some representation.

Lawyers in Housing Unit also engage in non-litigation focused advocacy, including policy, administrative and legislative advocacy, as well as organizing and teaching community and professional education sessions on a variety of issues, including lead paint elimination, domestic violence, criminal records and barriers, federal housing policy changes,  tenant eviction laws etc.

Lawyers in Housing unit also work with the Managing Attorney and other attornys in the Unit to establish connections to community and government agency partners and to develop impact advocacy strategies to remove barriers to housing and general access to the courts for low-income individuals and families.

We seek applicants with the following qualifications:

•           Litigation and trial advocacy experience strongly preferred

•           Minimum of 2-5 years of housing and/or litigation experience preferred

•           Ability and interest in zealously representing a significant number of tenants in court and administrative hearings

•           Ability to manage a significant caseload of individual clients with both public and private landlord-tenant matters

•           Excellent legal analysis skills

•           Excellent work ethic, organization, and communication skills

•           Excellent legal research and writing skills

•           Excellent oral advocacy skills

•           Experience and interest in policy and others forms of advocacy

•           Possess sound professional and legal judgment

•           Supervisory experience preferred but not required

•           Experience and ability to work with low-income and vulnerable individuals

•           Illustrate a high level commitment to racial justice advocacy

•           Fluency in another language helpful, but not required

To Apply: CLS will accept applications on a rolling basis until the position has been filled. You can submit your application on CLS’s website online at: https://clsphila.org/about-cls/available-positions/

What to Include in your application:

Please include a cover letter, resume, three professional references and one brief writing sample (10 pages or less).  Community Legal Services values a diverse work environment and strongly encourages women, people of color, people who identify as LGBTQ, and people with disabilities to apply.  CLS invites all applicants to include in their cover letter a statement about how your unique background and/or experiences might contribute to the diversity, cultural vitality, and perspective of our staff and legal services practice.

This is a full-time position covered by the collective bargaining agreement between Community Legal Services, Inc. (CLS) and the Philadelphia Legal Services Union N.O.L.S.W./Local 2320/UAW.  The current minimum starting salary is governed by that agreement and is subject to change according to the provisions of the current collective bargaining agreement.  Raises and benefits are also governed by that agreement.