Yale Law School is seeking applications for a Ludwig Clinical Fellow to begin on July 1, 2018. The Fellowship is designed for a lawyer with a minimum of three years of relevant practice experience who is interested in preparing for a career in law school clinical teaching. The Fellow will work with the Ludwig Center for Community & Economic Development (CED).

 CED provides transactional legal services to clients promoting economic opportunity and mobility. CED’s clients include affordable housing developers, community development financial institutions, farms and farmer’s markets, fair housing advocates, and neighborhood associations. CED’s legal services help our clients to expand access to financial services, bring arts institutions and grocery stores to chronically under-resourced communities, break down barriers to affordable housing development in high-opportunity communities, promote access to healthy foods, and facilitate entrepreneurship among low-income people.

 On behalf of our clients, our students negotiate and draft contracts; provide advice on the tax consequences of deal structures and entity choices; structure and carry out real estate transactions; represent borrowers and lenders in financings; engage in legislative and regulatory advocacy; form for-profit and not-for-profit entities; and resolve land use and environmental issues. In addition to representing clients, students in their first semester of the clinic take a seminar which covers federal, state and local policies affecting urban and suburban places; substantive law in tax, real estate development, and corporate governance; and transactional and regulatory lawyering skills, such as negotiation and drafting contracts.

 The Fellow’s responsibilities include representing clients, supervising students, assisting in teaching classes, and pursuing a scholarship agenda. The Fellow may be asked to co-teach a section of a half-semester research and writing program for first-year students.  Candidates must be prepared to apply for admission to the Connecticut bar.  (Candidates may qualify for admission without examination.) The Fellow will be supervised by the clinical faculty.

 The Jerome N. Frank Legal Services Organization is committed to building a culturally diverse and pluralistic faculty and staff committed to teaching and working in a multicultural environment. Candidates must be able to work both independently and as part of a team, and must possess strong written and oral communication skills. Experience in creative and community-driven advocacy is a strong plus. The position is for twelve months (July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2019) with the potential for renewal for an additional year if mutually agreeable. Annual salary is $63,000-68,000.  In addition, the Fellow will receive health benefits and access to university facilities.  Email a resume, cover letter, writing sample, and names, addresses and telephone numbers of three references to Osikhena Awudu, Program Manager, The Jerome N. Frank Legal Services Organization, osikhena.awudu@yale.eduApplications will be accepted until May 31, 2018 but will be reviewed on a rolling basis.

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The University of Michigan Law Clinical Fellows Program seeks applicants for a fellowship in its Entrepreneurship Clinic (EC). This is a two year appointment with the possibility of extension for a third year.  See the full announcement here.

Howard University School of Law’s Thurgood Marshall Center for Civil Rights offers 2 Fellowships to support the research and professional development of candidates pursuing a career in law teaching.  Launching in 2018, the Thurgood Marshall Center (“TMC”) will be Howard University’s flagship institutional setting for the study and practice of civil rights, human rights, racial justice and the law. The law school supports a unique intellectual community for faculty and students seeking to use the law to become social engineers on both a national and international scale.

Eligibility and Qualifications

Candidates should possess (or expect to possess by June 30, 2018) a JD, LLM, or equivalent legal training; a strong academic record; a high degree of scholarly writing ability; and demonstrated interest and background in using the law to promote civil rights, human rights, and/or racial justice.  We welcome candidates who, in addition, possess graduate training in other disciplines, community organizing experience, or other professional qualifications that will inform their research, teaching, and advocacy interests. We especially welcome candidates who plan to pursue work related to issues that concern the broader Black Lives Matter movement.  And finally, we welcome applications from graduates of any law school, though Howard Law graduates are strongly encouraged to apply.

Terms of the Fellowship

The fellow will be appointed for the year beginning July 1, 2018 until July 1, 2019. The fellowship is intended to be renewable for a second year. The fellowship offers a competitive salary and full benefits.

The fellowship responsibilities are as follows:

  • completing at least one substantial scholarly research project, presenting it as a work-in-progress to the school of law faculty, and submitting it for publication;
  • where appropriate, teaching one course at the law school during each year of the fellowship;
  • spearheading one community advocacy project with the TMC and/or the civil and human rights clinic each year of the fellowship;
  • assisting with the administration of the TMC; including coordinating events, meetings, and community outreach projects;
  • Formally and informally mentoring students in the civil and human rights clinic and TMC student volunteers

Application Process

Applications should be submitted by March 23, 2018 at the latest.

To apply for the fellowship, you must submit the following materials:

  • cover letter summarizing your qualifications, including any past and/or potential contributions to civil rights, human rights, and/or racial justice movements through research, teaching, and/or service;
  • scholarly research proposal, no longer than 800 words in length;
  • resume/CV;
  • law school transcript;
  • a writing sample;
  • names and contact information of two references prepared to write a letter of recommendation upon request. At least one should be a law professor familiar with your scholarly potential.

Visit the Howard University School of Law website http://law.howard.edu/  for more information about our institution.  Please submit applications and questions to ThurgoodMarshallCenter@law.howard.edu and address all correspondence to Justin Hansford, Executive Director of the center. No phone calls please.

The Cornell Center on the Death Penalty Worldwide is seeking applications for a clinical teaching fellow.   The full job posting is here:

https://apps.hr.cornell.edu/recruiting/facultyview.cfm?posting_id=_Clinical-Teaching-Fellow—Cornell-Center-on-the-Death-Penalty-Worldwide–Cornell-Law-School_WDR-00013668.

Cornell Law School is seeking applications for the position of Clinical Teaching Fellow for a two-year appointment beginning in summer 2018. The fellow will work primarily with Professor Sandra Babcock and staff at the Cornell Center on the Death Penalty Worldwide. The Fellow will help teach and supervise clinic students on projects relating to the rights of prisoners facing the death penalty around the world, self-determination in Western Sahara and the Occupied Golan, representation of persons on death row in the United States, and other human rights projects. The Fellow will also be involved in an annual training institute for African capital defense lawyers.

Substantial international travel is required. Ideal candidates will have at least two years of experience in the field of capital litigation or criminal defense, as well as experience in the field of international human rights. Candidates with strong foreign language skills (French, Spanish, or Arabic) are especially encouraged to apply. A law degree (JD or foreign equivalent) plus US bar admission is required.

Application Procedure:

Interested applicants should submit a CV and letter of interest by February 20 via:

https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/10794

The University of Michigan Law Clinical Fellows Program seeks applicants for a fellowship in its Community and Economic Development Clinic (CEDC). This is a two year appointment with a possibility of extension for a third year.

The Clinical Fellows Program is designed to allow attorneys to explore the possibility of a career in clinical teaching and fully support them in that endeavor. Michigan Clinical Fellows gain valuable experience and mentoring in clinical pedagogy and in their substantive area of practice. Their duties include clinical teaching and student supervision in conjunction with a clinic director, and participation in the operation and development of the clinic in which they teach. Support is provided for personal and professional development and scholarship. 

The CEDC provides transactional legal services to nonprofit and community organizations, social enterprises, and neighborhood-based businesses and entrepreneurs in Detroit and the metro Detroit area. The Clinic works with both start-up and established clients. New organizations seek assistance in formation, governance, tax and regulatory compliance. More established organizations seeks the CEDC’s assistance to accommodate their organizations’ and programs’ growth: draft and negotiate contract and leases; create worker cooperatives and social enterprises; counsel regarding land use, permits and other regulations; provide tax advice on income-generating activities; advise on employment issues; counsel on risk management; and research and advise on intellectual property issues.

The fellow will work with entrepreneurs and small businesses and partner with faculty at the Ross School of Business, the Stamps School of Art and Design, and the School of Computer Science and Engineering, as well as other schools and departments, through the Detroit Neighborhood Entrepreneurs Project, a new initiative in the CEDC supported by the JP Morgan Chase Foundation.

The ideal applicant will have a minimum of 3 years experience in at least one of the CEDC’s core areas of practice, a strong interest in clinical teaching, a demonstrated commitment to engage in public interest lawyering through transactional work for nonprofit and community organizations, and potential for scholarship and success as a clinical teacher. Candidates must hold a J.D. degree and be eligible for licensure in Michigan. Michigan’s Clinical Fellows salaries and benefits are very competitive. The fellowship begins in July, 2018.

Questions can be directed to Associate Dean David Santacroce at dasanta@umich.edu or 734-763-4319. We will begin reviewing applications on February 12, 2018, but will accept applications until the position is filled. Applicants shouldsend a letter of interest and résumé to:

 John W. Lemmer

Experiential Education Business Administrator

The University of Michigan Law School

701 S. State Street

Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1215

jwlemmer@umich.edu

The Health Justice Alliance Law Clinic is hiring an individual to serve as a clinical teaching fellow and supervising attorney for two years. The fellowship starts in the summer of 2018 and ends in the summer of 2020.  For details, see the full announcement here.

The Health Justice Alliance Law Clinic is hiring an individual to serve as a clinical teaching fellow and supervising attorney for two years. The fellowship starts in the summer of 2018 and ends in the summer of 2020. The two-year fellowship is designed for a lawyer interested in developing teaching and supervisory abilities in a setting that emphasizes a dual commitment—clinical education of law students and poverty lawyering in the context of a medical-legal partnership and in the areas of civil legal aid identified above. Successful completion of the fellowship results in the award of an L.L.M. in Advocacy from Georgetown University. See the full announcement here.