The Jerome N. Frank Legal Services Organization of Yale Law School (LSO) invites applications for its 2018 Summer Fellowship program. Applications will be accepted from December 4, 2017 and reviewed on a rolling basis. LSO is the main organization at Yale Law School providing legal representation to individuals and organizations in need of legal assistance but unable to afford private attorneys.  During the academic year, law students work closely with clinical faculty members to represent clients in a wide range of litigation and non-litigation matters, helping to fill a critical need in legal services delivery for poor and marginalized communities in Connecticut.  LSO seeks to hire 20-25 Summer Fellows to work with clinical faculty in order to continue this client representation. These are paid positions, with a salary of $6,960 for 12 weeks of full-time work ($14.50/hour). The Fellowship will run from May 22 to August 17, 2018, with some flexibility as to start and end dates.  Part-time work or full-time work for a portion of the Fellowship period may also be possible.

                Summer Fellows can expect to have a range of challenging and rewarding lawyering experiences during the course of their time at LSO, including client interviewing and counseling; factual development of cases; researching and writing legal memoranda; drafting of contracts and other legal instruments; interacting with opposing counsel, government actors, and community stakeholders; and negotiation and alternative dispute resolution.  In several of our clinics, students will make court appearances to argue motions or present evidence.  Fellows will work under the direct supervision of clinical faculty members and supervising attorneys, and will have significant responsibility for each case or project on which they work.  In addition, faculty members will host a weekly series of presentations and discussions for the Fellows on the work of the clinics, public interest lawyering, and other topics of interest.

                LSO clinics perform a wide range of exciting work, including litigation in state and federal court and before administrative agencies, transactional work on behalf of community organizations, and policy and legislative advocacy at the local, state, and federal levels.  For 2018, LSO seeks Summer Fellows for the following clinics:

  • Advanced Sentencing Clinic
  • Challenging Mass Incarceration Clinic
  • Ludwig Community and Economic Development Clinic
  • Criminal Justice Clinic
  • Immigration Legal Services Clinic
  • Housing Clinic
  • Veterans Legal Services Clinic
  • Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic

For more information on the work of each of these clinics, please visit www.law.yale.edu/lso.

                Students who are eligible for summer funding from their own sources and who need an early decision on their LSO application to qualify for outside support are encouraged to advise LSO of their situation and to request expedited review of their candidacy.

Interested students should email a cover letter specifying the clinic(s) in which you have an interest, a resume, writing sample, transcript, and contact information for two references to lso.fellowships@yale.edu. (Transcripts, if not immediately available, can be sent after the initial application, but before the submission deadline.) The final deadline to submit application materials is February 10, 2018.  Early applications are encouraged.

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The Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation of Harvard Law School (CHLPI) advocates for legal, regulatory, and policy reforms to improve the health of underserved populations, with a focus on the needs of low-income people living with chronic illnesses and disabilities.  CHLPI is a clinical teaching program of Harvard Law School and mentors students to become skilled, innovative, and thoughtful practitioners and leaders in health and public health law and policy.  Interns will be integrated into CHLPI’s ongoing projects, and may assist in:

Analyzing the potential impact of proposals to reform or replace the Affordable Care Act;

  • Providing law and policy analysis that informs state advocacy strategies to protect Medicaid;
  • Developing a national litigation strategy for anti-discrimination and improved access;
  • Implementing public health policies that target social determinants in order to improve health outcomes and reduce disparities; and,
  • Investigating best practices for initiatives to increase access to treatment and service programs serving vulnerable populations.

Interns will produce written products and develop policy analysis, research, writing, and presentation skills.  The Internship Program integrates formal assignments with informal opportunities to learn more about working in health law & policy and pursuing a public-interest career.

PROGRAM INFORMATION

The Summer Internship Program runs from Monday, May 21 to Friday, July 27, 2018. (Flexibility is allowed pending prior approval.)  Interns will work at CHLPI’s offices in the Legal Services Center Building (122 Boylston Street, Jamaica Plain, MA, 02130) for a maximum of 40 hours per week.

All students are encouraged to apply for public interest fellowships or similar funding scholarships that may be available through their schools.  CHLPI will support accepted candidates with paperwork as needed from the sponsoring organization.  Additional support may be available through CHLPI for those unable to secure sufficient funding.

The Program is open to all actively-enrolled law students, with a few slots potentially available to students enrolled in other graduate- and undergraduate-level programs.  Students should have a demonstrated interest in health law & policy.

CHLPI is dedicated to mentoring a culturally-diverse generation of health advocates and encourages people of color, people with diverse abilities, immigrants, people living with chronic illness, and members of the LGBTQ community to apply.

HOW TO APPLY

Applications for the Internship Program will be considered on a rolling basis until January 27, 2018.  Applicants should complete this online form.   Applicants should then submit a cover letter, resume, and writing sample as a single, consolidated PDF or word document to chlpi@law.harvard.edu.  (We encourage applicants to submit a policy or research paper as their writing sample, not a legal research memo or other document that was significantly edited by another person.)

Neighborhood Legal Services Program of the District of Columbia will have the following openings for up to seven legal interns for Summer 2018:

  • Two interns in the Family Law Unit
  • Two interns in the Brief Services Unit (BSU)
  • One intern in the Housing Law Unit
  • One intern in the Barriers to Employment Unit
  • One intern in the Veterans Legal Assistance Program (VLAP)

Students currently in their second year of law school are eligible to apply for these internships. An announcement for rising 2L’s will be available in early January 2018.

Interns will start the week of June 4, 2018 and end the week of August 10, 2018.  (The start and end dates are negotiable if a certain number of hours are needed.)  Interns will be expected to work full time, Monday through Friday. One Family Law Intern and the Housing Law Intern will be located at NLSP’s Deanwood Office (4609 Polk Street NE). The Barriers to Employment Intern, one Family Law Intern, one BSU Intern and the VLAP Intern will be at NLSP’S Headquarters (64 New York Ave NE). One Brief Services Unit Intern will be located at NLSP’s Southeast Office (2811 Pennsylvania Avenue, SE).

PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES

  • Family Law Unit and Housing Law Unit Interns will assist supervising attorneys through all stages of the litigation process, including client interviews, drafting complaints and motions, filing and responding to discovery, and preparing for hearings and trial.
  • Brief Services Interns will assist supervising attorneys through all stages of the brief services process, including client interviews, providing brief legal advice in all of NLSP’s practice areas, and assisting clients to fill out pro se court documents.
  • Barriers to Employment Interns will assist with Barriers to Employment cases such as criminal record sealing and complaints involving the Fair Criminal Records Screening Amendment Act. They will also survey patrons of our library-based clinics utilizing a pre-developed survey instrument to assist with an evaluation of our project.
  • Veterans Legal Assistance Program Interns will assist the supervising attorney with discharge upgrade cases and service-connected disability cases. This will include tasks such as gathering records through FOIA requests, reviewing all veteran records, including the Official Military Personnel File and any medical records, and the drafting of memoranda (based on provided templates) regarding the file.
  • Interns will have the opportunity to attend client meetings, court appearances, and community events.
  • Interns will receive training about relevant substantive law, litigation, and NLSP’s approach of using the law to fight poverty.
  • Interns will assist attorneys with legal research and writing.

EXPERIENCE AND QUALIFICATIONS

All rising 3L’s from accredited law schools are eligible to apply for an internship. Primary selection criteria include

1)      a commitment to serving low-income clients;

2)      passion for public interest law, particularly for civil legal services;

3)      strong academic performance, including excellent research and writing skills;

4)      clinical or other relevant experience working with low-income communities;

5)      exceptional communication skills (written and oral) and strong interpersonal skills; and

6)      an ability to work independently.

COMPENSATION

The internship is not paid; we will work with law schools that fund or provide credit to students.

ABOUT NLSP

Since 1964, Neighborhood Legal Services Program for the District of Columbia (“NLSP”) has provided free legal services in civil cases to low-income residents of the District of Columbia. NLSP pioneered the concept of a law office rooted in the neighborhoods that it serves and established landmark precedents that have retained their vitality and relevance. NLSP remains embedded in D.C.’s most low-income communities, builds its work on strong partnerships with community-based organizations, and seeks to achieve lasting change for its clients and their communities by using a full range of advocacy tools. Its diverse, multi-lingual, and passionate staff embraces an explicitly anti-poverty mission and shares a deep commitment to securing meaningful access to justice.

APPLICATION PROCESS

Those interested in applying for a Summer 2018 Legal Internship should email the application materials by 5:00 pm on Friday, December 1, 2017.

The application should include

  1. A cover letter explaining why you want to intern at NLSP, which of NLSP’s practice areas you are interested in, and why you are interested in that area.
  2. Up-to-date law school transcript.
  3. Resume (Please indicate whether or not you speak any languages other than English and your level of fluency in these languages.)
  4. Name and contact information for two references (law school professors, judges, practicing lawyers or others in a position to comment on the applicant’s qualifications for a position at NLSP).
  5. A relevant and substantive writing sample of original work product of no more than 5 pages in length.

Application materials and any questions should be directed to:

Heather Molina, Managing Attorney, Brief Services Unit and Intake

Emailhmolina@nlsp.org Phone: 202-832-NLSP (6577)

NLSP will interview candidates in early December 2017.

Washington Council of Lawyers features over 40 exciting opportunities in the October 2017 Public Interest Jobs Clearinghouse

DC Office of Attorney General, Child Protection Section is seeking an attorney with 1-5 years of experience.  Please see the full announcement for details.

 Northwestern Pritzker School of Law invites applications for a two-year clinical fellowship in Immigration Law, beginning January 8, 2018, in the Bluhm Legal Clinic’sChildren and Family Justice Center.  The fellowship will provide an opportunity for a recent law school graduate to gain experience in both clinical law teaching and immigration law.

Founded in 1992, the Children and Family Justice Center (CFJC) is a comprehensive children’s law office and part of the Bluhm Legal Clinic at Northwestern Pritzker School of Law.  CFJC attorneys and law students work together to promote justice for children, adolescents, and their families through direct legal representation, policy advocacy, and law reform.  The CFJC’s Immigration Law Project represents youth and indigent parents in deportation proceedings before the Chicago immigration court.  Immigration Law Project clients include unaccompanied immigrant children, immigrant youth involved in multiple legal systems, and parents at risk of separation from their U.S. citizen or immigrant children.

The Immigration Law Fellow will represent youth and parents in immigration court proceedings as well as assist in the supervision and teaching of clinical students.   The fellow will also design and participate in community outreach activities and use a broad range of strategies, including public advocacy and policy-related research, to advance the interests of immigrant youth and parents.

The fellowship is open to applicants with two to four years of immigration-related experience.  Admission to a state bar is required and admission to the Illinois bar is preferred.  Additional experience in family law or criminal law and fluency in Spanish are also preferred.

The deadline for applications is November 15, 2017.  Applicants should submit a one-page statement of interest describing the applicant’s reasons for applying for the fellowship, a resume, two letters of recommendation, and the names of three professional references.  Applications and inquiries should be directed to Uzoamaka Emeka Nzelibe at u-nzelibe@law.northwestern.edu.

The Bluhm Legal Clinic currently includes clinical faculty teaching in its Center for International Human Rights, the Donald Pritzker Entrepreneurship Law Center, the MacArthur Justice Center, the Environmental Advocacy Center, the Children and Family Justice Center, the Center on Wrongful Convictions, and other clinical programs that include appellate advocacy, criminal defense, civil litigation, externships, negotiations and trial advocacy.

NVRDC seeks a full-time staff attorney to advocate for and represent victims of crime in
DC. This attorney will work collaboratively with NVRDC’s leadership, legal team, and case managers to provide legal support and advocacy to victims of crime with a strong focus on advocacy for survivors of sexual assault. This individual will be resourceful, highly organized, a team player, a critical and analytical thinker, self-reflective and self-aware, and open to growth and learning. The staff attorney will be committed to working with people from diverse cultural, linguistic, economic, educational, and vocational
backgrounds to demonstrate NVRDC’s dedication to social justice and access to justice for
all victims of crime in DC.  See the full announcement here.