The Mississippi Center for Justice, a nonprofit public interest law firm, invites applications from law students to take part during the summer in our work advancing racial and economic justice in Mississippi. Law students will become a part of history as they bring their time and talents to our campaigns that address sustainable, systemic changes in policies related to predatory lending practices, affordable housing, access to healthcare for everyone, equality in education, re-entry services and more. Although we cannot provide a stipend, we will work with students to meet grant application deadlines at their schools or with other funders, and we can work with the school to provide course credit for the summer experience where appropriate. We will encourage all summer interns accepted into our program to submit an application to Equal Justice Works Summer Corps to earn a $1000 education award (applications open in spring 2018 – check www.equaljusticeworks.org for more information). We also offer a unique legal experience that isn’t limited by the walls of a courtroom. You’ll gain invaluable insight into the many ways that the law can and should improve the quality of life for all Mississippians.

Students should submit a résumé with current contact information, including an e-mail address, and a cover letter that outlines interest in the Mississippi Center for Justice and our work, and identifies what kind of experiences and policy areas draw them to our organization. Email applications are preferred.  Students should also include three references.  If you are applying for a summer grant from an external source, please make any deadlines you must meet clear in the opening paragraph. Please also indicate whether you have a preference for working out of our Jackson, Biloxi (Gulf Coast) or Indianola (Mississippi Delta) office, or if you are open to placement in any of our offices. More information about the Center is available at www.mscenterforjustice.org.

Applications for Summer 2018 placement will be reviewed as they are received.

 

Send resume, cover letter and references to:

Mississippi Center for Justice

Cathy Costello

P.O. Box 1023

Jackson, Mississippi 39215-1023

Phone: (601)352-2269

ccostello@mscenterforjustice.org

(Email submission alone is fine.)

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The LGBT Bar Association of the District of Columbia is proud to announce its 2017 Equality Fellowships.  The Community Equality Fellowship will support a law student working at DC-area LGBT legal non-profit organizations this summer.  The Lavender Equality Fellowship will provide the opportunity for a DC area law student to attend the 2017 Lavender Law Annual Conference & Career Fair in San Francisco this August.  The Equality Fellowships aim to encourage law students taking their first steps toward careers tackling our nation’s most complex LGBT legal issues.  The Equality Fellowships will pay up to $1,000 each to law students selected to be LGBT Bar Association of the District of Columbia Equality Fellows.

Qualifications for the Community Equality Fellowship

  • Current enrollment in a U.S. accredited law school
  • Summer employment offered by a legal organization in the Washington DC metro area
  • Preference will be given to those who work at an organization dedicated to LGBT rights/issues or those who show that their work will advance LGBT rights/issues
  • Employers must be non-profit and non-partisan
  • Commitment to work at least 20 hours per week for at least 10 weeks at the organization during the summer
  • Applicants must demonstrate commitment to LGBT rights and LGBT issues
  • Total funding that the law student is already receiving for summer employment cannot exceed $5,000 (not including the Community Equality Fellowship)

Qualifications for the Lavender Equality Fellowship

  • Current enrollment in a DC-area accredited law school
  • Commitment to attend the 2017 Lavender Law conference in San Francisco in August
  • Applicants must demonstrate commitment to LGBT rights and LGBT issues
  • Cannot be receiving any other external funding to attend the Lavender Law conference
  • Preference will be given to those attending the Lavender Law conference for the first time.

Application Materials

Students interested in the Equality Fellowships should submit the following materials:

  • Application form
  • Résumé
  • Two references (contact information only; letters of recommendation not required)
  • For Community Equality Fellowship Applicants only: Commitment letter or email from employer, which describes (1) the mission and focus of the organization; (2) the type of work being performed by applicant; (3) the duration and hours of the summer position; and (4) the amount of compensation (if any) being offered for the summer position

Please submit all materials by July 7, 2017 to LGBTSummerFellowships@gmail.com.  Questions about the Equality Fellowships can be sent to the above email address.  Applicants will be notified of the Equality Fellowship’s decision in mid-July.

Paul S. Lee

Pro Bono Manager

Dechert LLP

1900 K St. NW

Washington, DC 20006

+1 202 261 3428 Direct

+1 202 261 3116 Fax

paul.lee@dechert.com

http://www.dechert.com/pro_bono/

Follow Dechert: Facebook / Twitter / LinkedIn

Paid summer law clerk position in Maryland Legal Aid Bureau Prince George’s County Office’s general law practice, which handles landlord-tenant/housing, consumer, bankruptcy, elder law, public benefits, and family/domestic violence cases.

The pay rate is $13/hour for rising 2L students and $15/hour for rising 3L students.  This vacancy is not available to law school graduates or practicing attorneys.

Applicants should e-mail a cover letter and resume by COB Monday, May 8th TO:

Sabrina B. Wear

Supervising Attorney
Maryland Legal Aid

Metropolitan Maryland Office

8401 Corporate Drive, Suite 200

Landover, MD 20785

Phone: (301) 560-2145

Fax: (301) 429-8743

E-mail: swear@mdlab.org

www.mdlab.org

AARP Legal Counsel for the Elderly (LCE) champions the rights of seniors by providing free legal services to low-income DC residents age 60 and older.  LCE provides assistance with civil legal matters, including landlord/tenant matters, consumer issues including property tax cases, and public benefits.Depending on need and interest, the student(s) may be assigned to more than one project. The position is unpaid, but we are happy to work with any sources of funding available to the student.

Summer law clerks are sought to work on the following projects:

Alternatives to Landlord/Tenant Court Project:

The Alternatives Project combines social work, legal and volunteer coordination to help prevent eviction of District elders. The student will assist attorneys in contesting illegal rent increases at the Office of Administrative Hearings, obtaining necessary repairs and rent abatements through demand letters, defending against eviction actions in Landlord/Tenant Court, raising fair housing complaints for tenants who need reasonable accommodations for physical and/or mental disabilities, and/or representing tenants in administrative proceedings before the DC Housing Authority to address repair issues, rent calculations and program termination issues.

Homebound Elderly Law Project (Project HELP):

Project HELP provides critically important legal assistance and advocacy to homebound seniors. The student will assist with interviewing clients at home regarding legal problems, drafting legal documents that seniors may need, such as powers of attorneys or wills, administering a public-benefit checkup to ensure seniors are getting all the benefits to which they are entitled, identifying housing or consumer problems, and/or ensuring proper follow-up on identified legal problems.

Hotline:

The Hotline provides free legal advice, assistance and referrals. Students will assist hotline attorneys in gathering information about the client’s question or problem and providing advice or assistance. If the problem requires further legal representation, the student may assist with referring the client to an LCE staff attorney or other programs.

Ombudsman Legal Assistance:

The D.C. Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program at LCE advocates for residents of nursing home, assisted living facilities, community residence facilities and residents in their private homes. The law clerk would assist the DC Long-Term Care Ombudsman’s staff attorney with individual cases before the Office of Administrative Hearings (OAH). This support would include resident visits, drafting motions and participation in hearings.  In addition, the intern would assist with legal research on a variety of issues including long-term care Medicaid, nursing home resident rights and social security.

Public Benefits and General Services Unit (PBGS):

The goal of the PBGS is to ensure seniors receive the income, benefits and services to which they are entitled that enable them to live independently in the community. The student will assist attorneys in cases involving Social Security, Supplemental Security Income, Medicaid, Medicare, home health services, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, and Veterans benefits. The student may also be asked to assist with small consumer cases or utility disputes.

Schedule H Property Tax Case Handling:

Schedule H is a DC tax credit for low-income individuals with high housing costs, providing a benefit of up to $1,000 per year. LCE’s Schedule H Tax Project assists low-income seniors who do not need to file a full tax return.  The student will meet with clients, assist them with filling out the Schedule H forms, advise them regarding supporting documentation, and follow up with the Office of Tax Revenue regarding disposition. The student will also assist with pro bono clinics at DC law firms.

Self-Help Office (SHO):

SHO provides community-based, free legal services to DC seniors at five partnering sites in the community, including churches and senior centers. The student will assist clients with obtaining legal information, self-help guides, public benefits checkups, applications for public benefits, drafting consumer complaint letters, referrals to social service agencies, assistance filing small claims cases, and/or information on requests for vital records.

To apply, submit a cover letter, resume, writing sample, and two references to Janay Todd, Volunteer & Outreach Coordinator, Legal Counsel for the Elderly, jtodd@aarp.org. Please indicate in your cover letter the specific project(s) that interest you or whether you are interested in any and all of the projects.

The Harvard Legal Aid Bureau seeks to hire approximately 15 law students to serve as Summer Legal Interns for 2017. Summer Legal Interns will be the primary case handlers on approximately 10-15 cases at a time in the areas of housing, family, government benefits, and wage and hour litigation. They interact directly with clients, opposing parties, witnesses, and government agencies, engage in extensive factual and legal investigation, draft motions and briefs, research legal issues, conduct discovery, and appear and argue in court. Rising 3Ls and 2Ls may apply, though rising 3Ls and rising 2Ls who have taken an evidence or trial advocacy course are preferred.

HLAB Summer Legal Interns are supervised by HLAB’s Clinical Instructors, practicing attorneys with years of trial and supervision experience, and students will be trained in all the relevant areas of the law. HLAB Summer Legal Interns generally experience a broad range of litigation and legal experience in as many as four primary practice areas. In the Family Law practice, HLAB represents victims of domestic violence in restraining order hearings, divorces, paternity, visitation, child support, and custody disputes. In the Housing Law practice, HLAB represents individual clients who are being evicted from public, subsidized, and private housing, and also works with tenant unions and other progressive organizations to ensure the availability of affordable housing in the Greater Boston area. In the Government Benefits practice, HLAB represents clients at hearings to obtain or retain their Supplemental Security Income and Social Security Disability Insurance benefits or unemployment benefits. Finally, in the Fair Wage practice, HLAB allows students to work on affirmative lawsuits addressing violations of state and federal labor laws. We ask student to choose a primary concentration in the area of housing or family law. Summer Legal Interns working at HLAB maintain a full-time (40 hours per week) schedule. Though HLAB is unable to pay its Summer Legal Interns due to funding restrictions, we work closely with hired students to secure third-party funding. The Harvard Legal Aid Bureau was founded in 1913 to provide free legal services for low-income people in the Greater Boston community. As the nation’s oldest student-run legal services organization, the Harvard Legal Aid Bureau aspires to be an engine for progressive change and social justice. To learn even more about the Harvard Legal Aid Bureau, visit http://www.harvardlegalaid.org/.

Application Instructions (accepted on a rolling basis until all positions are filled): Please send (1) a resume, (2) a cover letter, (3) a law school transcript; (4) two references; and (5) a legal writing sample to: Jackie Ebert, Outreach Director Harvard Legal Aid Bureau 23 Everett Street, First Floor Cambridge, MA 02138 HLABrecruitment@gmail.com

If you are interested in helping people convicted of crimes they did not commit, consider applying to an internship with the Mid-Atlantic Innocence Project (MAIP). In MAIP’s short history, we have helped free 21 people in the District of Columbia, Virginia, and Maryland. Law students play an essential role in the work we do: student interns help us identify meritorious cases, investigate, draft briefs and other filings, prepare for hearings, and more.

In turn, we hope to expose students to as much variation of work as possible in order to afford them an opportunity to learn through experience the skills involved in the practice of law – skills that are transferable to whatever career path you choose. Students participating in this program will be assigned several cases at a time. They will be writing legal memos, factual memos, recommending what path cases should take, engaged in field investigation, and meeting with clients and witnesses in prisons. Students will participate in our regular office case meetings as well as team and individual meetings with their supervisor

The expected commitment for the summer term is 40 hours per week with some flexibility. Our office is located in the Foggy Bottom area.

Required Application Documents: Resume Cover Letter Transcript Writing Sample 2 References Please email materials to Parisa Dehghani-Tafti at: ptafti@exonerate.org. We are interviewing applicants now and will be reviewing applications on a rolling basis. Priority will be given to applications received before February 1, 2017. If you have questions, please contact Parisa Dehghani-Tafti at the above email address. We look forward to working with you!

The Health Law and Policy Clinic (HLPC) and the Food Law and Policy Clinic (FLPC) of the Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation (CHLPI) of Harvard Law School are accepting intern applications for summer 2017. Please see below for details on applying and find more info on our website here

PROGRAM INFORMATION:

Dates for the 2017 Summer Interns Program are Monday, May 22nd to Friday, July 28th for a minimum of 40 hours per week. There is some flexibility with regard to start and end dates as long as summer interns make at least an eight-week commitment.

Summer interns are unpaid. They are eligible for all public interest fellowships including law school summer public interest funding programs that may be available through their schools (these vary by school) and Equal Justice America (EJA) and through other opportunities listed on resources such as PSJD. CHLPI program staff will support accepted candidates with whatever paperwork is needed from the sponsoring organization for these applications.

The summer internship program takes place at the Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation, located in the Jamaica Plain neighborhood of Boston.

Information about the Health Law and Policy Clinic:

The Health Law and Policy Clinic (HLPC) aims to improve the health of vulnerable populations, including low-income people living with HIV and AIDS, by expanding access to high-quality healthcare, reducing health disparities, supporting community education and advocacy capacity, and promoting legal, regulatory, and policy reforms that contribute to a more equitable individual and public health environment.

Students will have the opportunity to develop cutting-edge policy recommendations at the state and national levels in the legislative, litigation, and regulatory arenas. Projects involve analyzing the potential impact of proposals to reform or replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA), providing law and policy analysis to national and state coalitions advocating to protect the Medicaid program, developing a national litigation strategy for anti-discrimination and improved access efforts, and investigating best practices for initiatives to increase access to treatment and service programs serving vulnerable populations.

Students gain a wealth of hands-on experience in current and emerging health law and policy issues, and develop written products such as fact sheets, in-depth reports, comment letters, testimony, presentations, and draft legislation or regulatory guidance. Students have the opportunity to develop a range of problem-solving, policy analysis, research and writing, oral communication, and leadership skills.

HOW TO APPLY:
We are accepting applications on a rolling basis until January 31, 2017 and will review applications starting in January 2017.

Applicants should complete this online form and submit the following materials in one consolidated pdf or word document to chlpi@law.harvard.edu.

  • Cover Letter
  • Resume
  • Writing Sample (We encourage you to submit a writing sample that is either about health law and policy or is a research paper or policy paper, not a legal research memo. It is okay if this is an undergraduate paper.)

Information about the Food Law and Policy Clinic:

Established in 2010, the Harvard Law School Food Law and Policy Clinic (FLPC) addresses the health, environmental, and economic consequences of the laws and policies that govern our food system. FLPC strives to increase access to healthy foods, support small-scale and sustainable farmers in breaking into new commercial markets, and reduce waste of healthy, wholesome food. As the oldest food law clinical program in the United States, the FLPC is a pioneer in the field of food law and policy, and serves as a model for lawyers and law schools entering this field. FLPC is also a leader in the laws and policies surrounding food waste, FLPC interns have the opportunity to work on a wide range of projects focused on reducing food waste at the national, state and local levels.

The following four initiatives are an expression of our dedication to resolving the environmental, public health, and economic consequences of our food system:

  • Food Policy Community Empowerment
  • Food Access and Obesity Prevention
  • Food Waste
  • Sustainable Food Production

Summer interns in the Food Law and Policy Clinic have the unique opportunity to engage in action-based learning to gain a deeper understanding of the complex challenges facing our current food system. Interns get hands-on experience conducting legal and policy research for individuals, community groups, and government agencies on a wide range of food law and policy issues, and are challenged to develop creative legal and policy solutions to pressing food issues, applying their knowledge from the law school classroom to real-world situations.

Examples of project areas include providing policy guidance and advocacy trainings to state and local food policy councils, assessing how food safety regulations could be amended to increase economic opportunities for small local producers, recommending policies to increase access to healthy food for low-income communities, identifying and breaking down legal barriers inhibiting small-scale and sustainable food production, and drafting state and federal legislation to reduce the amount of wasted food.

FLPC interns have the opportunity to practice a number of valuable skills, including legal research and writing, drafting legislation and regulations, commenting on agency actions, public speaking and trainings, and community organizing, among others. Interns also have the opportunity to travel to meet with clients; for example, FLPC travels to work in places like Mississippi, West Virginia, and Navajo Nation, among others.

HOW TO APPLY:
We are accepting applications on a rolling basis until January 31, 2017 and will review applications starting in January 2017.

Applicants should complete this online form and submit the following materials in one consolidated pdf or word document to flpc@law.harvard.edu.

  • Cover Letter
  • Resume
  • Writing Sample (We encourage you to submit a writing sample that is either about food law and policy or is a research paper or policy paper, not a legal research memo. It is okay if this is an undergraduate paper.)